Monday, June 18, 2018

TONGAAT HOME AFFAIRS NEED TO APPOINT AN OFFICIAL TO GUIDE THE THRONGS OF PEOPLE IN A FRIENDLY MANNER

(PEOPLE WAITING TO BE ATTENDED TO INSIDE THE HOME AFFAIRS OFFICE IN TONGAAT) By Subry Govender The Tongaat office of the Department of Home Affairs needs a staff official or a volunteer who will be able to make life easier for people who visit the centre. This is what I found lacking when I visited the office on Monday, June 18 (2018) to renew my passport. When I arrived at about 12:15pm I found that the centre was already filled with people who had thronged the office from the early hours of June 18. They were there to apply for new ID documents, to apply for new or to renew passports; or to collect their new ID documents and passports. After waiting in the queue outside the office for about five minutes, I asked the young man in front of me what was the reason for his visit. “O’h I am here to renew my passport and I have been told to wait in the queue outside here,” said the student who resides in Durban North. We chatted for a while about the congestion inside the Home Affairs office and agreed that we have to wait for another three or four hours to finalise the renewal of our passport procedures.
After a few moments I went up to the security guard at the entrance and informed him that I had come to renew my passport and asked him what was the procedure. He responded by saying that I have to join the queue outside the entrance and follow those in front of me. After I re-joined the queue and waited for some time, a lady and her son came along and went straight to the entrance without joining the queue. The lady’s son was also there to renew his passport. He was informed that they must go straight to the official who was issuing ticket numbers. The young man from Durban North and I immediately went to the security official and informed him that we were also there to renew our passports. The security guard’s colleague, a lady official, was taken aback and said: “Who asked you to stand in the queue. You must go straight to the official who is issuing the tickets and join the queue there,” said the lady official. Now imagine this. After wasting about 30 minutes outside the entrance we had to join another queue to obtain our tickets. Nevertheless, after waiting for a few minutes I was issued my ticket and number to join another queue to get finger printed and to be photographed. This was about 12:50pm. The official in this queue took her own time and it was after another about 45 minutes that I had my finger prints and photo processed. “What is the next procedure?”, I asked the lady official. “You must wait to be processed in the front,” she said. She appeared to be too tired and not interested in entering into any conversation with me. I wanted to make a few suggestions about how the service could be improved and how the people could feel welcomed at the centre. The officials should not feel that they are doing favours to the people visiting the centre. After observing her lack of interest and her “don’t bother me” attitude, I joined the third queue to process the renewal of my passport. There were more than 100 people before me. During this time, I noticed that a lot of other people were having similar problems after not being informed fully of the procedures.
I spoke to a young lady who had arrived at the centre at 11am and she appeared to be frustrated at the delay in her identity document being processed. This was around about 2pm. “I wish there will be some official here who will interact with the people and make life easier,” she said. She added: “If they have someone talking to the people and helping them to join the proper queues, then I think people will not be so angry. This is my second visit here because the first time they just didn’t care about helping me. “I think they must also have an electronic system to keep the people informed as to the next number being served. If not the electronic system, then they must use a loud speaker to announce the next number.”
The lady who resides in an area nearby was served at about 30 minutes later. When my turn came at about 3:25pm, I found the same official who took my finger prints and photo at the desk. She was as usual mechanical and was not keen on listening to any suggestions about improving the service. When I insisted, she said: “You know we work very hard here and are also under-paid.” After she completed my application, I had to go to the cashier to pay R400 for the renewal of my passport. Here too we had to wait for some time because the cashier was not at her post. The young man from Durban North then asked another official: “Where is the cashier? We have been waiting for a while.” The official sitting at a desk, outside the cashier’s cabin, shouted: “Cashier. You are wanted.” After a few moments, the cashier lady returned to her post. The young man gave his money and slip number to her. But she told him: “Wait. I have to check something.” She then proceeded to attend to the mother and her son and me. We paid our monies and wished the young man from Durban North well. “Hope you will be finished soon,” I told him. It seems that officials here are over-burdened and that’s the reason they find it difficult to interact in a friendly manner with the people who visit the centre. But all is not gloom. About 30 minutes after I left the Tongaat office, I received an SMS from the Department of Home Affairs with this message: “We acknowledge receipt of PASSPORT application for …(ID number) on 18 June 2018. More info: 0800601190 OR www.dha.gov.za”. Ends – June 19 2018 (subrygovender@gmail.com)

Friday, June 8, 2018

MOON GOVENDER - ONE OF THE BACKROOM BOYS WHO PROMOTED NON-RACIALISM IN SPORT AT A TIME WHEN THE APARTHEID GOVERNMENT PRE 1994 TARGETED ANTI-APARTHEID ACTIVISTS.

(MOON GOVENDER AT THE ENTRANCE TO CURRIE'S FOUNTAIN IN THE ARELY 1970s) During the hey-days of the historic struggles for a non-racial and democratic society there were many people who made their contributions from “behind the scenes” without the limelight that followed many of the activist leaders at that time. In this feature in our Struggle Heroes and Heroines column, Subry Govender writes about the life of Moonsamy “Moon” Govender, one of the unsung activists who for nearly four decades until 1999 played a pivotal “backroom” role in promoting Durban’s Currie’s Fountain stadium as the mecca of non-racial sport and society in general. BY SUBRY GOVNDER "MR CURRIE'S FOUNTAIN" “I started as a labourer and I was introduced to the caretaker who was then known as the Sardar. He gave me a mop and a bucket and told me I must go and start washing the toilets that were all constructed of wood and iron. “From there I built myself and carried on.”
(MOON GOVENDER AT THE STANDS IN CURRIE'S FOUNTAIN) Mr Moonsamy “Moon” Govender, who was known as “Mr Currie’s Fountain” for most of the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, was speaking to this correspondent in early 2 000 after he retired a year earlier from serving as “captain” of the historic Currie’s Fountain stadium for more than 45 years. He was 16-years-old when in 1952 he was recruited by the then secretary of the Durban Indian Sports Grounds Association, Mr Dave Moodley, to work at Currie’s Fountain. “At this time,” he told me, “I was working as a waiter at the Durban International Club in the Grey Street area”. “I got this job as a waiter after the famous educationist, Dr A D Lazarus, introduced me to the Durban International Club. My father used to at this time work as a gardener at the home of Dr Lazarus in Effingham Heights in Durban and on several occasions I used to join him at the home of Dr Lazarus. “My father told Dr Lazarus that it was not right for me to work as a gardener as well and that he should try to fix me a job. That is how Dr Lazarus used his influence to fix me a job as a waiter. “When working at the Durban International Club I met top people, including Mr Dave Moodley, who was the secretary of the Durban Indian Sports Grounds Association at that time. One day early in 1952 he approached me and asked me whether I would like to work for him at Currie’s Fountain. This is how I started work at Currie’s Fountain in early 1952.” Moon Govender saw this move from the Durban International Club to Currie’s Fountain as a major step in his working life. Although his entry into Curries Fountain started off at what could be described as an unpleasant experience, he quickly progressed from a toilet cleaner, grass cutter and labourer to the association’s office as a clerk. When in the late 1950s, the then secretary of the Durban Indian Sports Grounds Association, Mr R S Govender, passed on, Moon Govender was appointed as the new secretary.
(MOON GOVENDER WITH ONE OF THE OFFICIALS, MR ROY RAJU) As secretary he came under the influence of some of the most prominent anti-apartheid sports activists who were not only committed to the promotion of non-racial sport but also the transformation of the apartheid social, political and economic areas of life into an equal and non-racial society. Some of the forgotten veterans who influenced Moon Govender’s role in the promotion of non-racial sport were Mr E I Haffejee, who was president of the Durban Indian Sports Grounds Association from 1960 to 1964; Mr R Bijou, who was president of the Durban Sports Ground Association from 1964 to 1974; and Mr Ramhori Lutchman, who was president of the Durban Sports Gound Association from 1974 to 1982. Mr Govender told me that he had heard from his fellow activists that the leaders who initiated the establishment of Currie’s Fountain were Mr Albert Christopher, who was the first president from 1925 to 1926; Mr S L Singh, who was president from 1926 to 1960; and political icon, George Singh.
(MR RAMHORI LUTCHMAN IS ONE OF THE OFFICIALS MOON GOVENDER WORKED WITH AT CURRIE'S FOUNTAIN) Moon Govender also worked with sports leaders such as Abbas Rasool, who was president of the Durban Sports Gound Association and the Durban Football Association in the early 1980s; Rama Reddy, who was president of the South African Soccer Federation at that time; R K Naidoo, who was the first president of the SASF Professional League; Ashwin Trikamjee, who was also president of the SASF Professional League after Mr Naidoo; Charles Pillay, Vic Pillay, S K Chetty, Danny Naidoo, Norman Middleton, M N Pather, who was one of the top leaders of the anti-apartheid tennis union and SACOS, and Morgan Naidoo, who was involved in the non-racial swimming federation. He also came under the influence of non-racial cricket administrators such as Abdullah Khan, S K Reddy, Pat Naidoo, Harold Samuels, Krish Mackerdhuj, and Cassim Docrat.
(MR R. BIJOU IS ANOTHER OFFICIAL THAT MOON GOVENDER WORKED WITH AT CURRIE'S FOUNTAIN) All these activists were involved in the international struggle to isolate apartheid sport until there was freedom for all South Africans. Over the years since 1952 Moon Govender witnessed and participated in the struggles for non-racial sport from Currie’s Fountain. “This is where non-racialism in all codes of sport was born at Currie’s Fountain,” he told me. “And also to make it interesting we had people like Dennis Brutus and all the journalists who showed enormous courage in promoting non-racial sport at a time when the Government was only interested in harassing, intimidating, detaining, banning and denying activists their passports. “These people used to come to Currie’s Fountain and they were always targeted by the security branch. In order to evade the security branch officers they used to run away from the stands and hide behind Currie’s Fountain. In order to protect them I used to go right in the front in the ticket box and watch for these security policemen.” It was also during his term as “Mr Currie’s Fountain” that some of the finest football teams, footballers, cricketers and boxers who highlighted their skills at the mecca of non-racial sport. Some of the football teams include Aces United, Avalon Athletic, Moroko Swallows, Sundowns, Orlando Pirates, Berea, Hearts, Maritzburg City, Verulam Suburbs and Lincoln City. Some of the footballers who caught the imagination of the people during Moon Govender’s work at Currie’s Fountain included Sewnarain Lal, Lionel Homiel, Dharam Mohan, Excellent Mthembu, Gava Ellis, “Black Cat” Cele, Scara Wanda, Sugar Ray Xulu, Hector Fynn, Pat Blair, Charles Carey, Deena Naidoo, Dudu Munsami, Fikky Vally, Stanley Govender, Daya Maistry, Sadeck Ebrahim and Preston Julius.
(MR R K NAIDOO, who was president of the Federation Professional League (FPL), was one of the sports leaders that Moon Govender worked with at Currie's Fountain) Currie’s Fountain also became a home for many anti-government activities by the black consciousness organisations and trade union movements such as Cosatu. One of the major events scheduled for Currie’s Fountain in 1974 was the pro-Frelimo rally that was organised to celebrate the rise of Frelimo to power in Mozambique. But the security police and the authorities in Durban had other ideas. “When the police came here they approached us and wanted to know what was going on because the rally was banned. We told them we are having a dance and all sorts of entertainment. But they didn’t listen to that. They said you are talking lies. They said they wanted to know the truth about where the BC leaders were. “At this time Strini Moodley, Saths Cooper and also Steve Biko were inside the stadium. They were all under the stand where the referees used to change and no one knew about this except me. I told them there’s nothing happening here, you can see people are dancing. “But the security police officer did not listen to me and he pulled me out and gave me a slap. Despite this harassment and intimidation by the security branch, I did not succumb to their antics. With the help of people like Luthcman, R K Naidoo, Morgan Naidoo, M N Pather, and other stalwarts we continued to make available Currie’s Fountain for the promotion not only of non-racial sport but also anti-apartheid organisations such as Cosatu, the BC movements, United Democratic Front and other organisations. “We wanted to play our role in keeping alive the struggles for a non-racial and democratic South Africa.”
(MOON GOVENDER'S GRAND-FATHER AND OTHER MEMBERS OF HIS FAMILY AT THE DUFFS ROAD SUGAR ESTATE IN DURBAN IN THE 1930s) After 1990 when Nelson Mandela was released from life imprisonment and the ANC, PAC and other organisations were unbanned, Moon Govender once again made available Currie’s Fountain as a venue for political rallies and the revival of political organisations. When Moon Govender retired in 1999 after more than four decades as “Mr Currie’s Fountain”, it was the pinnacle of a working life that had its origins in the humble settings of a sugar estate at Ottawa on the KwaZulu-Natal North Coast. His father, Chinna Kollandrai Govender, came to South Africa from the Thanjavur District of Tamil Nadu in south India. He first worked as an indentured labourer at the Ottawa Sugar Estate, north of Durban near Mount Edgcombe. His father, after serving his first five-year indenture, moved to Frasers Sugar Estate on the North Coast where he married his mother, Muniamma Govender. Moon was born in April 1936 at the Duffs Road Sugar Estate where his parents moved to in the early 1920s. Moon was part of a large family of five brothers and five sisters.
(MOON GOVENDER'S FATHER, MOTHER AND OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS AT THEIR SUGAR ESTATE HOME ON THE NORTH COAST) Like most children in the 1930s and 1940s, Moon Govender did not have the opportunities to further his education after attending primary school at the Jhugroo Government-Aiden Indian School in Ottawa for a few years at that time. “I had to give up schooling because of the tough conditions at home. My father wanted me to start work and to contribute to the upkeep of our home.
(MOON GOVENDER IN HIS YOUNGER DAYS) “I used to go and work in the sugar estate, starting at five o clock in the morning and what we used to get for a day was two-and-half cents a day. We used to call it tickey. “When it came to food I am not ashamed to tell you this that every day our favourite food was porridge and herbs. “Despite my hard life and lack of a proper education, Curries Fountain gave me the opportunity to interact with some of the most prominent anti-apartheid activists and leaders and to make my contribution from the background to the freedom struggles.” At the time of his retirement in 1999, Moon Govender lived with his wife, Priscilla, in Unit 10, Phoenix. He passed on, on January 3 2008 at the age of 71. He is survived by his wife, five children, a number of grand-children and three brothers and four sisters who range in ages from 62 to 83. – ends (subrygovender@gmail.com) May 13 2018

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

SOUTH AFRICANS CANNOT ALLOW THE CURRENT STATE OF LAWLESSNESS IN OUR NEW DEMOCRATIC ORDER TO CONTINUE ANY LONGER

BY SUBRY GOVENDER The tragic killing of a nine-year-old school girl in an hijacking incident in Shallcross, Durban, on the morning of Monday, May 28 2018, is yet another reminder of the manner in which our new South African democratic society has degenerated and is descending into anarchy. It is totally shocking and unforgiveable that the young girl, Sadia Sukhraj, being taken to school by her parents is killed in an incident involving car hijackers. The shooting of the Shallcross school girl took place at a time when the broadcast, print and the social media reported the killings of two young girls, aged 16 and 17, at a school hostel in the North West Province at the weekend. A 19-year-old teenager was arrested for the murders. At the same time two teenage sisters and a baby were murdered by two men in the Kathelong area in Johannesburg. Also at the weekend an MK veteran, Samson Madonsela, was shot dead during an ANC Youth League regional conference in Mpumalanga. One person was arrested. The Shallcross tragedy took place almost at the same time when South Africans were informed of yet another cash-in-transit heist, this time outside the city of Polokwane in the Limpopo Province in the early hours of Monday morning. One person was injured as the violent thugs made off with an undisclosed amount of cash. VIOLENT CRIME IN ALMOST ALL RESIDENTIAL AND BUSINESS AREAS The killing of the young girl in Durban, the cash-in-transit heist outside Polokwane, the murders of the two school girls in the North-West, the slaughter of two sisters and a baby in Kathelong and the murder of the MK veteran are the latest in a series of killings, hijackings, cash-in-transit heists, political killings, taxi murders, and general lawless deterioration that have intensified in our beautiful country recently. This lawlessness has been festering in almost every part of our business and residential areas for nearly two decades. LAWLESSNESS HAS GRIPPED OUR NEW DEMOCRATIC SOUTH AFRICA This is shown by the antics of majority of taxi drivers who show no respect for the rules of the road. They stop anywhere and don’t care about motorists behind them. No one dares to confront the taxi drivers. Motorists fear that taxi drivers will have no qualms about pulling out their guns and firing at anyone who is brave enough to speak up for their rights. POLITICAL KILLINGS Political thugs and their cohorts have also come to the fore. These opportunists only want to enrich themselves and their allies and they show no mercy when they are exposed for their corrupt and deviant activities. They hire hit men to take out their opponents and over the past year or two a number of politicians have been gunned down or killed in gruesome ways. The latest political killings bring back memories of the everyday killings that took place between political enemies in the 1980s and early 1990s in KwaZulu-Natal and the Johannesburg region. More than 20 000 people lost their lives violently during this period of political war in KwaZulu-Natal alone. The latest political killings have reared their ugly heads at the same time as violent criminals roam the length and breadth of South Africa wreaking havoc on the lives of South Africans. They roam the streets without any fear of being arrested by the police. VIOLENT CRIMINALS THINK THEY CAN OPERATE WITH IMPUNITY As already stated, these violent criminals are found in almost all fields of life and all citizens live like prisoners in their own homes. Hard-working and tax-paying citizens have to go to extreme lengths to protect their lives behind high walls, guard dogs, barbed wire and electric fences, burglar guards and armed rapid response security. But despite these costly protective measures, many South Africans are still killed in their homes by violent criminals who monitor the movements of their victims. They brutally break into the homes of people and show no mercy to victims. The killers are so ruthless that they smash, hammer and shoot their victims irrespective of whether they are senior citizens, women, or children. It seems they operate with impunity. VIOLENT CRIMINALS HAVE DISRUPTED THE STRUGGLES FOR A "BETTER LIFE FOR ALL" Since the dawn of our new democracy in April 1994, our successive governments since the first democratic order of President Nelson Mandela did everything possible to improve the lives of the people. But sadly while trying to create “a better life for all”, at the same time violent criminals, thugs, drug lords, war lords and other violent scums have flourished in every nook and corner of the country by taking advantage of the liberal policies of the new democratic order. REFERENDUM SHOULD BE HELD ABOUT THE DEATH PENALTY One of the liberal actions was the withdrawal of the death penalty from the legal statutes. Our new leaders had been of the view that the death penalty was not necessary in our new democratic dispensation. They felt that the death penalty belonged to the archaic past and that in the new South Africa the people would respect the rule of law and they would also respect the right to life of citizens. But sadly the growing number of brutal killers show no respect for the rule of law or for the lives of fellow citizens. BARBARIC BANDITS SHOW NO RESPECT FOR THE RIGHT TO LIFE OF CITIZENS These bandits have created a climate of lawlessness, anarchy and fear in our new democratic order. Over the past few decades hundreds of families whose close relatives and friends had been tortured and killed have seen no closures because the most of the brutal barbarians have not been brought to book. I personally know of three family members, one a medical doctor, who had been gunned down by robbers between the mid-1990s and 2 000 but the killers have not yet been brought to book. The families have received no information from the police about whether there has been any progress in tracking down the killers and bringing them to justice. It seems the police files are collecting dust in rusty cabinets of some police officers. I am certain many thousands of other murder files are also collecting dust in police cabinets. ARE WE MOVING INTO A STATE OF ANARCHY? The intensified killings in KwaZulu-Natal and other parts of the country have just shown that our country is descending into a state of anarchy. Enough is enough. We cannot put up or tolerate this type of lawlessness any longer. PRESIDENT CYRIL RAMAPHOSA MUST ACT AS A MATTER OF URGENCY Our government under President Cyril Ramaphosa must be told in no uncertain terms that he must take steps to counter the violent thugs, warlords, drug lords and other lawless elements. President Ramaphosa, in addition to shaking up police actions, must initiate steps for a referendum where the people of South Africa can decide on the question of whether the death penalty should be introduced to combat violent killers and murderers. In addition to this action, we the citizens must also take action where ever we reside. Every street must have a street committee in order to monitor the criminals and to work with the police to bring the wanton murderers and killers to book. We have had enough. The buck now stops with President Ramaphosa. VIOLENT CRIME SHOULD NOT BECOME PART OF OUR LIVES IN A NEW DEMOCRATIC ORDER EVEN THOUGH WE FIRST ATTAINED OUR FREEDOM 25 YEARS AGO IN APRIL 1994. Ends –subrygovender@gmail.com May 28 2018

Friday, May 18, 2018

SOUTH AFRICAN GREAT-GRAND-FATHER STILL PLAYING COMPETITIVE GOLF AT THE RIPE OLD AGE OF 90

(MERVYN BOOTH ON THE 18TH HOLE AT WINDSOR PARK GOLF COURSE IN DURBAN AT THE END OF THE FIRST DAY OF THE 36-HOLE TOURNAMENT HE PARTICIPATED ON HIS 90TH BIRTHDAY ON SATURDAY MAY 12 2018) BY SUBRY GOVENDER A great-grand-father in South Africa who took up golf in 1956 to keep fit and healthy is still gracing the golf courses today, 62 years later, at the age of 90. Mervyn Rodney Booth, who was born at Durban’s Addington Hospital on May 12 1928, competed in a two-day 36-hole championship tournament on his 90th birthday at Durban’s Windsor Park golf course this past week end on May 12 and 13. The tournament was organised by his club, Athlone Golf Club, which is based at Windsor Park.
(MERVYN BOOTH (CENTRE) WITH TWO OF THE GOLFERS HE PLAYED WITH AT THE 36-HOLE TOURNAMENT) Mr Booth, who is known as “Baba” Mervyn, played in the C Division medal tournament with scores of other golfers, many years younger than him. Unlike a number of his fellow golfers who participated in the tournament by riding around the golf course in a golf cart, “Baba” Mervyn pulled his own cart and walked the 36 holes over the two days. He also played from the back competition tees instead of the senior “white” tees. At the end of the first day (Saturday, May 25), the club officials and members showed their appreciation by celebrating his 90th birthday.
(MERVYN BOOTH WITH ATHLONE GOLF CLUB DEPUTY CHAIRPERSON, LOU ZIETSMAN, AND ANOTHER MEMBER ON THE 18TH HOLE AT WINDSOR PARK GOLF COURSE AT THE END OF THE FIRST DAY OF THE 36-HOLE TOURNAMENT) “We celebrate Mervyn as a legend because we believe he is the oldest golfer in the world to have participated in a two-day tournament,” said Lou Zietsman, deputy chairperson of the Athlone Golf Club. “He is an example to all of us that you don’t give up on golf or any other sport when you reach such a ripe old age in your life. “We want to wish Mervyn many more years of life on the golf courses.”
(MERVYN BOOTH BEING CONGRATULATED BY A LADY GOLFER AT THE 18TH HOLE ON THE FIRST DAY OF THE 36-HOLE TOURNAMENT) In addition to playing in the club’s tournaments on a Saturday, “Baba” Mervyn is a regular at Windsor Park every Tuesday and Thursday. On a Tuesday, he plays in the Brian Angel tournament and on a Thursday, he plays in the Wimpey competition. Recently on Tuesday, May 8, “Baba” Mervyn playing off a 28 handicap beat his fellow golfers by winning the Tuesday tournament with a score of 44 points. He told me he took up golf after he was inspired by golfers of the calibre of Papwa Sewgolum, Gary Player and Vincent Tshabalala. “In my younger days I was a damn good golfer and won many tournaments in Durban and at other golf courses on the south and north coast.”
(MR LOU ZIETSMAN, DEPUTY CHAIRPERSON OF ATHLONE GOLF CLUB, ADDRESSING THE 90TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION OF MERVYN BOOTH)
(MERVYN BOOTH CUTTING THE CAKE AT HIS 90TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION AT THE ATHLONE GOLF CLUB ON SAT MAY 12 2018) Life for “Baba” Mervyn, who speaks fluent IsiXhosa and IsiZulu, has not been an easy ride. At the age of seven, his parents moved from Sydney Road in Durban to Swartberg, near Kokstad, to work on a farm called Balmoral. His uncle, Harry Conolly, leased the farm and he recalled that some “political” people should seek shelter on the farm. “I was a young man and I did not know what was going on. But I was told by my parents that my uncle provided shelter for some very important people who were fighting for freedom. “It was only later I found out that some of the people he provided shelter to at the farm were Oliver Tambo and Walter Sisulu. My uncle also provided them with transport to move them from one hide out place to another.” After attending primary school in Lusikisiki and Aliwal North, young Mervyn attended a trade school for four years at the St Andrews Mission and the St Jospeh’s Trade School.
(ATHLONE GOLF MEMBERS CELEBRATING THE 90TH BIRTHDAY OF MERVYN BOOTH) After working in Kokstad for six months as a carpenter, young Mervyn moved to Durban at the age of 18. He stayed in Prince Edward Street and at the young age of 24 in 1952 he married Conctance McNeal with whom he had five children – three boys and two girls. When his wife passed on in the mid-1960s, Mervyn Booth married Kathija Sayed from the Grey Street area in Durban. Despite the prejudices of that time, Mervyn and his “Indian” wife continued with their married life and produced two children – a daughter and a son. Mervyn is now a great-grand-father and has outlived two of his sons. “Despite the hurdles of my early life and my tough working life as a carpenter, I managed to spare some time for golf. “I believe being involved in golf has given me long life. I will continue to play until my last. I want to be an inspiration to others who reach the ripe-old age like me,” he said. – ends (May 18 2018) mjio908(subrygovender@gmail.com)
(MERVYN BOOTH CUTTING THE 90TH BIRTHDAY CAKE AT THE ATHLONE GOLF CLUB ON SAT MAY 12 2018)

Thursday, May 17, 2018

FLIGHT OF YOUNG LOVERS - STORIES AND PICTURES OF LAUNCH PUBLISHED IN POST AND SUNDAY TRIBUNE IN DURBAN

FLIGHT OF YOUNG LOVERS LAUNCH STORY PUBLISHED IN THE SUNDAY TRIBUNE ON APRIL 29 2018
FLIGHT OF YOUNG LOVERS LAUNCH PICTURES PUBLISHED IN POST ON MAY 9 2018

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

MUNIAMMA FAMILY HISTORY BOOK LAUNCH IN PICTURES

THE DESCENDANTS OF INDENTURED ANCESTORS IN DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA HAVE LAUNCHED THEIR MUNIAMMA FAMILY HISTORY BOOK, "FLIGHT OF YOUNG LOVERS", AT THE ENCHANTED GARDENS CONFERENCE CENTRE IN THE CITY ON SATURDAY, APRIL 28 2018. MORE THAN 200 FAMILY MEMBERS FROM ALL OVER SOUTH AFRICA ATTENDED THE HISTORIC EVENT TO PAY TRIBUTE TO THEIR ANCESTORS WHO ARRIVED FROM TAMIL NADU IN INDIA IN MARCH 1882, THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS - MUNIAMMA AND YELLAMMA - AND THEIR SECOND GENERATION DESCENDANTS WHO GAVE BIRTH TO THE GREATER MUNIAMMA FAMILY. THE FAMILY TODAY RUNS INTO SIX GENERATIONS AND NUMBERS MORE THAN 500. THE BOOK WAS RESEARCHED, COMPILED, AND EDITED BY ONE OF THE THIRD GENERATION DESCENDANTS, MARIMUTHU SUBRAMONEY (AKA SUBRY GOVENDER), A VETERAN STRUGGLE JOURNALIST WHO WAS INVOLVED AS AN ACTIVIST JOURNALIST DURING THE STRUGGLES AGAINST APARTHEID AND WHITE MINORITY RULE IN THE 1970S AND 1980S. THESE PHOTOS ARE OF FAMILY MEMBERS WHO ATTENDED THE FUNCTION:
(THE BOOK, FLIGHT OF YOUNG LOVERS, DISPLAYED IN FRONT OF THE PHOTOS OF MUNIAMMA'S ELDEST SON, PERI NADASEN GOVENDER, AND HIS SECOND WIFE, SALATCHIE)
(PHOTOS OF THE FIRST GENERATION DAUGHTER, MUNIAMMA, AND HER HUSBAND, COOPOOSAMY GOVENDER, WHO GAVE BIRTH TO 14 CHILDREN, 11 OF WHOM WHO SURVIVED TO GIVE BIRTH TO MORE THAN 500 FAMILY MEMBERS, RUNNING INTO SIX GENERATIONS TODAY)
(PHOTOS OF MUNIAMMA AND SOME OF HER SONS AND DAUGHTERS THAT WERE DISPLAYED IN THE MEMORY STAND AT THE BOOK LAUNCH CEREMONY)
(PHOTOS OF DEPARTED SOULS OF THE FIRST AND SECOND GENERATION DESCENDANTS OF THE MUNIAMMA FAMILY DISPLAYED ON THE MEMORY STAND)
(SECOND GENERATION DESCENDANTS WHO ARE STILL AROUND TODAY ARE MRS AMOY MOODLEY (83), MRS SOUNDLER GOVENDER, WIFE OF PERI BOYA PERCY GOVENDER, AND IN THE WHEEL CHAIR, MRS SAVUNDALAY PADAYCHEE, OF THE NORTHERN KWAZULU-NATAL TOWN OF DUNDEE. THERE ARE ALSO THIRD GENERATION ELDERS IN THE PHOTO - MRS PANJALA NAIDOO AND RUMBA NAIR IN WHEEL CHAIR)
(SOME OF THE DESCENDANTS AND SPOUSES OF THE ELDEST CHILD, BAIGIUM NAIDOO. SEEN IN THE PICTURE ARE THE ELDERS - MR BENNY REDDY, SON-IN-LAW, AND MRS ANEE NAIDOO, DAUGHTER-IN-LAW AND WIFE OF BOYA NAIDOO)
(DESCENDANTS OF THE SECOND CHILD - PERI NADASEN GOVENDER)
(DESCENDANTS OF THE THIRD CHILD - CHINNA NADASEN GOVENDER)
(SOOBOO GOVENDER FAMILY DESCENDANTS)
(DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC MUNSAMY RUTHINSAMY GOVENDER)
(SOME DESCENDANTS OF VELAYADAM DICK GOVENDER)
(SOME DESCENDANTS OF SALATCHIE SUBRAMONEY FAMILY)
(SOME DESCENDANTS OF DUNDEE SAVUNDALAYA AUNTY FAMILY)
(SOME DESCENDANTS OF PATCHA FAMILY)
(SOME MEMBERS OF THE AMOY MOODLEY FAMILY) MIXED PHOTOS
(MORE MIXED PHOTOS)
(MORE MIXED FAMILY PHOTOS)
(MORE MIXED PHOTOS)
(ENDS - SUBRY GOVENDER - subrygovender@gmail.com May 2 2018)